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Lemady / Arise and Pick a Posy

Nature and Human Nature
The Wild Side of Town
Bird-Watching
Harvest Anthem
Laura's Song
Butterfly Galliard / Falling Star
I Was The Child
Another World In The Night
Fox On The Rails /Dance Of The Starlings
Woodlands Of England
See This Lake, Son?
My Beautiful Bomb Pit
Comin' In On A Wing And A Prayer
Tomorrow's Too Late
Why Have You Stolen Our Earth?
Human Nature
Stand Quite Still
If There's No Other Way
The Rockery Rock
This Blessed Plot
Don't Clear That Corner Away
Art Nouveau
Brambles on a Hill
Our Stolen Season
Good King Henry
You Never Know Where We Have Been
Harvest Will Come
Just Human Nature
The Albion River Hymn: prelude
The Albion River Hymn
Sweet Themmes Run Softly
Three Men in a Boat
Down The Stream The Swans All Glide.
Swan-Upping Song
The Sheep Shearing Song
The Building of Our Bridge
Twickenham Ferry
Letters
Still On The Wild Side of Town
Rumour Hill
Life on the River
Horse Music
Yellow Taxi / New Jerusalem
Dragonfly
Lemady / Arise and Pick a Posy
Foxy Comes to Town
The Wind in The Willows
John Moore (1907-1967)
Lines Composed a Few Miles Above Tintern Abbey
Gilbert White (1720-1793)
Landlines

[Trad. arr. Martin Carthy / Trad. arr. Eliza Carthy, Martin Green & Saul Rose /
Trad. arr. The Albion Band]

Sung by Martin Carthy on Keith Dewhurst and The Albion Band's album Lark Rise to Candleford. Doug Morter played the guitar solo. This was included in 2001 on the anthology The Carthy Chronicles. Another version from the Albion Band's 1988 show The Wild Side of Town was included in their album Songs from the Shows.

Eliza Carthy sang Lemady on her and Martin Green's album Dinner. She said in the record's sleeve notes:

Lemady was suggested to me by Saul Rose, who remembered it from his misspent folk-rock youth and helped me and Martin to change the timing. Honourable P's Martin Carthy and Norma Waterson provided words.

A similar version called One Midsummer's Morn found at the Mudcat ist listed below. And compare to this the Copper Family's version of Sweet Lemeney on their CD Coppersongs 3.

Lyrics

The Albion Band's version

Hark, says the fair maid, the nightingale is singing
The larks they are ringing their notes up in the air
Small birds and turtledoves on every bough are building
The sun is just a-glimmering; arise my dear.

Rise up, my fair one, and pick your love a posy
It is the finest flower that ever my eyes did see
It's I will bring you posies, both lily-white pinks and roses;
There's none so fair a flower as the lad I adore.

Lemady, Lemady, you are a lovely creature
You are the fairest flower that ever my eyes did see
I'll play you a tune all on the pipes of ivory
So early in the morning before break of day.

Arise and pick a posy, sweet lily pink and rosy
It is the finest flower that ever I did see
Small birds and turtledoves on every bough are building
The sun is just a-glimmering; arise my dear

One Midsummers Morn
lyrics from Mudcat

One midsummer's morn, as I was a-walking,
The fields and the meadows were covered with green
The birds a-sweetly singing, so pleasant and so charming
So early in the morning by the break of day.

Oh hark, hark, the nightingales are singing,
The larks they are taking their flight into the air,
And in every green border the turtle-doves are building,
Just as the sun was glimmering; arise, my dear!

Arise, arise! Go pluck your love a posy,
One of the prettiest flowers that grows in yonder green,
Oh yes! I'll arise and pluck lilies, pinks and roses,
All for my dearest Lemady, the girl I adore.

Oh Lemady, oh Lemady, what lovely lass art thou,
Thou art the fairest creature that ever my eye did see!
I'll play you a tune all on the pipes of ivory,
So early in the morning, by the break of day.

They why should my true love be banished from me?
For if she should die I should never see her more.
Oh why should my parents look so slightly on me?
They rob me of my Lemady, the girl I adore

Vale of Lanhern, Cornwall, England 1890

Eliza Carthy's Version

As I was a-walking one midsummer's morning,
Fields and the meadows were covered with green
Birds a-sweetly singing, so pleasant and so charming
Early in the morning by the break of day.

Hark, says the fair maid, the nightingales are singing,
larks they are winging their notes up in the air,
Small birds and turtle-doves on every bower building,
Day is just a-glimmering; arise, my dear!

Rise up, my fair one, and pick your love a posy,
It's the fairest flower that ever my eyes did see,
It's I will pick you posies, both lily-white, pinks and roses,
There's none so fair a flower, that's the lad I adore.

Lemady, Lemady, you are a lovely creature,
You're the fairest flower that ever my eyes did see!
I'll play you a tune all on the pipes of ivory,
Early in the morning, by the break of the day.

Why should my true love go banished from me?
For if he should die I would never see him more.
It was my cruel parents that look so slightly on me?
Because of the colour that my true love wears.

Lemady, Lemady, you are a lovely creature,
You're the fairest flower that ever my eyes did see!
I'll play you a tune all on the pipes of ivory,
Early in the morning, by the break of the day.

Lemady, Lemady
Lemady, Lemady

A Cornish version
 
Limadie

Oh early one morning as I was walking
The fields and the meadows they looked so green and gay
The birds sang so sweetly, so pleasant and so charming
So early in the morning at the break of the day.

Oh hark, oh hark how the nightingale is singing
The lark she is taking her flight in the air
The turtle dove in every green bower is building
The sun is just glimmering, arise then, my dear.

Arise, love, arise, I have plucked you a nosegay
The sweetest of flowers that grow in yonder grove
Oh I have plucked them fresh from the lily, pink and rosetree
And it's all for my Limadie, the girl that I love.

O Limadie, O Limadie, thou art the fairest flower
Thou art the sweetest flower that e'er mine eyes did see
And the tunes that I will play to thee shall be on flute of ivory
For my heart is so full of soft love melody.

Oh why should my true love be banished from me?
Oh why should she die and I never see her more?
Because that her parents look so slightingly upon me
I too will die for Limadie, the girl I adore.

The Cornish  version can be found in Canon Kernow: Songs and Dances of Cornwall by
Inglis Gundry (ed.), The Federation of Old Cornwall Societies, 1966. From the accompanying notes:

...found... in the papers of the late Grand Bard, Morton Nance, at Truro Museum, together with the Cornish translation made by his predecessor, Henry Jenner... It now seems clear that originally this song was an aubade sung by a group of young men (or sometimes young women) to their “lemans” or sweethearts early on midsummer morning, or “leman-day”, and that the imaginary person known as Lemady, or Limadie, or Lemminy (in the Catnach ballad with much the same words as ours) came into existence only after this custom of "sweethearting" fell into disuse and was no longer understood."

This version was collected by Jenner from William Gilbert of the Vale of Lanherne; Sabine Baring Gould had a (different) version from Gilbert's father, Samuel, who kept the Falcon Inn there

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